STEVE HOLZER 

 

 

              

 

         

 

 

  ELEMENTALS

 

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2008)

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2006)

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2008)

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2008)

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2008)

Acrylic paint on wood panel   
15 x 15 x 1-1/2" (2008)

 

 

 

 

               L SYSTEMS                                

 

 


 

The focus of my work in recent years has been to create a space in which to explore the aesthetics and materiality of paint. The reduction of each of these ideas begins to reveal an underlying, unifying, template that allows a conceptual vocabulary with which I may address these ideas to form.

The materiality of the paint as part of the subject itself requires the paint be made in the studio from acrylic resin, raw materials and pigment. Experimentation has allowed me to achieve a certain luminosity in the chromatic charge of the paint. Light activates the surface.

This body of work, presented as a cohesive group titled “Elemental,” is an examination of color as subject. Reductive to the very elements of composition and form, the work at first seems very simple and then becomes increasingly more complex.

Informed by contemporary mathematics used to describe complexity and recursivity, I have used the L-system to explore the dynamics of line and repetition. The L-system is created with an algorithm, a formula for repeating the L as a line, never crossing itself, to create a plane filling line. The entrance or beginning of “Elemental” is simply described with orange pigment snap-lined on the wall. The chalk line on the wall, just pigment, is temporary. The line becomes architectural, an object, with the two L shapes. The level of recurrence, how many times it is repeated (how many L’s to the plane), demonstrates a frequency and frequency is color. These two works, the chalk line and the two L shapes, are the introduction. 

The six pieces seen next are each, in essence, two L shapes which describe a square, providing the plane on which color is applied. The squares have been adjusted in different ways that imply modularity, a compatibility, with other objects that might fit into or onto them, a pattern. The colors and body of the paint are the primary and secondaries.

The context for the presentation is for the primary color panels, red, blue and yellow, to be seen as one group, with generous space between the works. The opposite wall shows the secondary colors, green, orange and violet. These six panels are developed to best suit the nature of the pigment, the material itself, and the light it reflects-- monochrome objects presented as a contemplative whole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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